Category Archives: Irish Culture

10 Top Things to do in Cork

Cork has the second biggest city in Ireland and Cork County is the largest county in Ireland. It is also home to some beautiful scenery and some fantastic tourist attractions so we decided to pick out 10 of the top things to do in Cork below!

Looking for places to visit in Cork? Check out our list for our top 10 recommended things to do in the famous Rebel County!

Blarney Castle & Blarney Stone             

Blarney - Top Things to do in Cork
Blarney Castle

Where else could we start a list of the top things to do in Cork but with Blarney Castle and the Blarney stone? The famous stone of eloquence is situated at the top of the magnificent Blarney Castle and folklore has it that anyone who kisses it acquires the gift of eloquence or as we say in Ireland, the gift of the gab! Surrounding the castle are beautiful gardens for you to take a stroll through at your own leisure.

Cobh Heritage Centre

Cobh Heritage Centre - Top Things to do in Cork
Cobh Heritage Centre – Annie Moore statue

Another must visit during your time in Cork is the Cobh Heritage Centre which is located about 25km southwest of Cork City, in the town of Cobh. Here you are given the opportunity to learn about life in Ireland during the 18th& 19th centuries where mass emigration, the famine and criminal transportation are the main themes. The centre also hosts an exhibition on the history of the Titanic; Cobh was the last port of call before it made its final faithful voyage across the Atlantic.

Spike Island

Spike Island - Top Things to do in Cork
Spike Island

Known as Ireland’s Alcatraz, Spike Island is also located near Cobh, just off the coast. Originally founded as a military installation it later became a prison which was in operation until the 1980s. In 2015 the island was re-opened as a tourist attraction & it was recently crowned as Europe’s leading tourist attraction. Tours of the island take in the fort, prison cells and the gun emplacements. An after-dark tour is also available for those who would be interested in a more edgy but fun experience.

English Market

Of course one of the best things to do in Cork is to sample the local cuisine and the best place to start is at The English Market in Cork City Centre. Surrounded by beautiful 19th-century architecture the market is famous for supplying local specialities such as drisheen (a type of blood pudding), spiced beef and buttered eggs. Even Queen Elizabeth II decided to pay a visit to the market in 2011 to see what all of the fuss was about!

English Market

Shandon Bells, St Anne’s Church

On the north side of Cork city, across the cities famous River Lee, St Anne’s Church constructed in 1722 and is famous for its Shandon Bells tower.  The 18th-century bells are still in use presently and are widely regarded as one of the top things to do in Cork. St Anne’s Tower is a distinctive sight overlooking Cork’s skyline. There will be an opportunity for visitors to ring the bells from the first floor and enjoy unrivalled views out over Cork city and beyond.

Shandon Bells, St Anne’s Church

Blackrock Castle Observatory

Blackrock Castle Observatory is certainly worth a visit when in Cork city. The castle is located in the beautiful scenic suburb of Blackrock on the banks of the River Lee.  This structure is said to be the oldest still in use in the city and will give you an excellent appreciation of the maritime history in Cork. It is very interactive and features a planetarium, a cinema and a host of interactive exhibits. The village is also a great place on a Sunday between 10am -2pm for the Sunday Market which offers a great range of foods to experience on your way to the castle observatory.

Blackrock Observatory Cork

 Garnish Island

Garnish Island - Top Things to do in Cork
Garnish Island

Garnish Island is situated in Bantry Bay just off the West Cork coast. The island is renowned for its beautiful gardens, Martello Tower and exotic plants, most of which are rare to Ireland. A short scenic ferry cruise, departing from the village of Glengarriff, takes you out to the island. One thing to keep an eye out during the journey are the seals who frequently visit the rocks on the southern shore of the island.

Jameson Distillery Midleton

Jameson Experience - Top Things to do in Cork
Bottles of Jameson at the Jameson Experience

For any whiskey fans then the Jameson distillery in the town of Midleton in East Cork should definitely be on your bucket list. A guided tour of the distillery begins with a short film to give you a brief background to Jameson’s history before a guide takes you through the distilling process from the start from finish. At the end of the tour, each participant receives a free glass of whiskey (those who are 18 and over!).

Cork City Gaol

Cork City Gaol - Top Things to do in Cork
Cork City Gaol

Rounding off our list of top things to do in Cork we come to Cork City Gaol. Located within walking distance from the city centre, the museum gives you the opportunity to see what life was like inside one of Ireland’s most famous jails during the 19th & 20th centuries. Exhibitions including lifelike figures, sound effects and furnished cells make it an enjoyable experience for visitors of all ages.

St. Fin Barre’s Cathedral

This is a beautiful gothic style cathedral located about 10 minutes walk from the heart of Cork city. Designed by architect William Burges in 1862. It is certainly worth a visit while in Cork and is one of the top things to do. It is constructed with Cork limestone and the interior walls are made of Cork marble. You will come across beautifully stained glass and intricately carved icons in the walls.

St. Fin Barre’s Cathedral

Get in Touch-

The best way to learn about Cork and its sights and attractions is to visit yourself. We offer a range of ways to see Cork from Self Drive, Chauffeur or Rail. Contact us today for a quotation including some or all of these locations today –

USA & Canada (FreeFone) 1877 298 7205

Australia (FreeFone) 1800 823578

UK (FreeFone) 0800 096 9438

International+353 69 77686

https://www.irishtourism.com/

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10 More Things to Do in Dublin

Dublin is full of attractions that will enhance your travel experience in Ireland with exciting things to do in Dublin. The city is small in comparison to other major cities, but it still has plenty of choices and offers days of sightseeing.  This blog post is a continuation from our previous blog 10 of The Most Popular Things to do in Dublin. Dublin has a long eventful history from Viking invasions, civil wars and rebellions just to name a few! Dublin is close to beautiful beaches and mountains, and are all within thirty minutes or less from the city centre. This makes the city special by giving yourself a big city feeling as well as getting lost in nature and the outdoors if you wish.

10 More Things to Do in Dublin

Epic The Irish Emigration Museum

Dublin has many great attractions but a visit to EPIC The Irish Emigration Museum should be on everyone’s to-do list. The museum will take you on a journey through Ireland as a country of emigration. Learn about the reasons why 10 million people left Ireland and the impact that it had on the world. You will understand Irish culture through this very interactive museum. After a visit to EPIC, you will be fully informed of the influences Irish history on international society.

Things To Do In Dublin
EPIC Ireland

The Brazen Head – Dublin’s Oldest Bar

Part of the great charm of Dublin is its variety of bars and what each offers. They give you a unique insight into the Irish drinking culture of past and present. The Brazen Head is Dublin’s oldest pub and it is full of charm and character.  Through the history of the bar, if the walls could talk, there would be many a good story to be told!! This 12th-century pub has entertained customers including Daniel O’ Connell, Michael Collins and James Joyce to name a few. It is the perfect place to enjoy some fresh ales on tap and some delicious Irish dining.

Things to Do in Dublin
The Brazen Head
Source:dublinovernight.com

Enjoy a Food Tour

Ireland has a proud tradition of producing high-quality food and Dublin has a great sample of international eateries to suit all tastes. Like anyone on vacation, eating is part of daily life and it is important to find good, nutritious and locally sourced produce. A great way to learn about the Dublin food scene is to take the Delicious Dublin Walking Tour that is done by Ketty Elisabeth of the French Foodie in Dublin blog. Another good option worth considering is Fab Food Trails. The guides on this tour are well-known food critics and will be able to inform you about Dublin’s artisan food scene.

things to do in Dublin
Dublin Food Tour

Walk on the Great South Wall

While on vacation sometimes, it is about exploring away from the well-known locations and finding some off the beaten track places — The Great South Wall fits into this category. This amenity is quite close to the city centre so there is no need for a car or anything and it is great to walk all the way out to Poolbeg Lighthouse. There is some walking through industrial warehouses but it’s worth it as it offers amazing views of Dublin Bay, Sandymount Strand and Dublin Mountains. Dublin Bay’s Great South Wall dates back to 1716 and is part of Dublin’s heritage and definitely one of the things to do in Dublin.

Great South Wall via Sandymount Strand

Little Museum of Dublin

Another museum that is worth a visit in Dublin is The Little Museum which tells the history of the Irish capital over 100 years. In 2011 this museum was launched with historic objects donated by the Irish people and currently, it has over 5,000 artefacts in the collection. For this, it is nicknamed the “people’s museum”. This museum is highly regarded and it is one of the top museums in TripAdvisor’s ratings and Irish Times newspaper voted it as “Dublin’s best museum experience”. You will have the chance to see the cultural and social history of Dublin in the 20th Century.

things to do in Dublin
The Little Museum of Dublin

Teeling Whiskey Distillery

Ireland is well known for its fine quality whiskeys. The Teeling Whiskey is the newest addition to Dublin in over 125 years. It is located in the heart of Dublin City and the distillery is a fully functional pot still refinery producing over 500,000 litres of spirits each year. The distillery is extremely innovative and are able to craft distinctive whiskeys with their intelligent fermentation and techniques. What makes this distillery special is that you will be able to see how a real distillery works. This is a great opportunity to discover everything you want to know about whiskey and distilling in Ireland.

things to do in Dublin
Teeling Whiskey Distillery

Croke Park Stadium Tour & GAA Museum

Croke Park is Ireland’s biggest stadia with a capacity of over 82,000 and is home to Ireland’s National sports of Gaelic Football and Hurling. You can take a stadium, museum tour and learn about the varied history that the Gaelic Athletic Association and how it played an important role in Ireland’s history. During the summer months, the stadium is a hive of activities and if in Ireland during the weekend of a game, it is worth a visit and to hear the Irish people explode into colour as they support their counties. This stadium and museum tour is highly interactive and gives a great experience of learning about the national sports in Ireland and its influences in Irish society.

things to do in Dublin
Croke Park

National Botanic Gardens & John Kavanagh “The Gravediggers”

Located in the suburb of Glasnevin approximately less than half an hour from Dublin City Centre. If gardens are of interest to you and want to take time out from the hustle and bustle of the city — The National Botanic Gardens of Ireland are an ideal oasis of calm and beauty. Entry to the gardens is also free. You can wander through the extensive collection of plant species and cultivars from all over the world. Very close to the botanic gardens is John Kavanagh “The Gravediggers” which is built into the walls of Glasnevin Cemetery one of the most famous cemeteries in Ireland. It gets its nickname from gravediggers who used to come in for a few drinks after digging. This bar is one of the oldest bars in Dublin and very popular as a location in the film industry and commercials.

things to do in Dublin
National Botanic Gardens, Glasnevin

Phoenix’s Park & Dublin Zoo

Phoenix Park can take great pride in being the largest enclosed park of any capital city in Europe. The park was originally formed as a royal hunting park in the 1660s and it opened to the public is 1747. On a visit to Phoenix Park, you will come across some fallow deer that can still be seen today. The actual size of the park in 1,750 acres. Inside the park, you will find some beautiful stately homes, such as Áras an Uachtaráin — home of the President of Ireland and the America Ambassador has a residence there. It is one of the great things to do on a visit to Dublin, with the park only a half a mile from Dublin City Center. It is also home to Dublin Zoo, which offers a great experience while on a visit to the park. It is great for walking, cycling, exploring nature and for recreational running.

things to do in Dublin
Phoenix Park, Dublin City

Get in Touch-

If you want to learn about things to do in Dublin and Ireland, come and discover for yourself. Contact our travel team today for a quotation including some or all of these Dublin attractions today –

USA & Canada (FreeFone) 1877 298 7205

Australia (FreeFone) 1800 823578

UK (FreeFone) 0800 096 9438

International+353 69 77686

https://www.irishtourism.com/

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10 Places to Visit in County Clare

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Clare is a county on the heart of the west coast of Ireland located along the  Wild Atlantic Way coastal route. With a varied terrain ranging from rolling countryside to the Atlantic coastline.  County Clare is an excellent place to discover culture in Ireland. The county is blessed with places to visit – from the UNESCO Burren, Cliffs of Moher Geopark, award-winning Loop Head and some historic towns like Bunratty, Killaloe and Ennis.

Read about the 10 Places to Visit in County Clare

Places to visit in county Clare Cliffs of Moher
Cliffs of Moher

The Cliffs of Moher

The Cliffs of Moher is one of Ireland’s most visited attractions and when you will visit you will see why! The cliffs rise to a height of 120 metres above the Atlantic Ocean and even reach 214 metres at the highest point near O Brien’s Tower, an observation tower built by local landlord Cornellius O’ Brien. The views are stunning and on a clear day you can see the Aran Islands, Galway Bay and even as far as Connemara!

Killaloe, Lough Derg

Lough Derg

On the opposite side of County Clare in the East, you will find Lough Derg. There are two Lough Derg’s in Ireland, the other one is in Donegal.  Lough Derg in Clare is the second-biggest lake in the Republic of Ireland and the third-biggest on the island of Ireland. It shares is shores with northwest Galway and eastern Tipperary. On the Clare side, some nice places to visit along the lakeshore include Killaloe, a picturesque town with nice bars and restaurants and a 13th-century cathedral, Scariff and Mountshannon where you can take a boat trip across to Holy Island in the centre of the lough.

Bunratty Castle and Folk Park

Bunratty Castle & Folk Park

Bunratty Castle is the most complete Castle in Ireland, it is completely furnished on the inside giving the visitor a real sense of what the castle would have looked like for residents in the 15th century. Bunratty Folk Park which surrounds the castle is a reconstructed village where buildings like the rural farmhouse, the village shop and post office and several different types of traditional cottages have been recreated. The folk park gives a fantastic insight into what life was like for different segments of Irish society in the early 19th century. If you are staying in Clare region, think about visiting Bunratty at night to take part in one of their famous medieval banquets. Advance booking is required for this and we can book this for you as part of any tour visiting Clare.

Places to visit in Clare. Craggaunowen Pre-Historic Folk Park, County Clare, Ireland.
Craggaunowen Pre-Historic Folk Park

Craggaunowen

This attraction is especially good if you have children with plenty of parkland to run around in and a collection of unusual animals such as wild boar! On-site the primary feature is a reconstructed Crannog; an artificial island on which people built houses, kept animals, and lived in relative security from rival clans, a ring fort. The attraction also has a souterrain which is an underground tunnel used for storage or to hide from would-be attackers, a fulacht fia which was used for cooking in the Bronze Age and Craggaunowen Castle, a typical example of a fortified tower house built in 1954.

Places to visit in county Clare The Burren
Black Head, The Burren

The Burren – UNESCO World Heritage Site

The Burren refers to the regions of Clare and south Galway which share a unique karst landscape known for its rare species of flora and fauna. The main towns in the Burren region are Ballyvaughan, Kinvara, Tubber, Corfin, Kilfenora and Lisdoonvarna. The Burren National park is located in Corofin, here you will find five marked walking trails that take you through many different fascinating and beautiful habitats, such as limestone grasslands, hazel/ash woodlands and limestone pavements. If you plan to visit the national park, a good place to start is the Clare Heritage Centre in Corofin. In the village of Balllyvaughan consider visiting Ailwee Caves, a cave system consisting of over a kilometre of passages leading into the heart of a mountain.

Places to visit in County Clare, Poulnabrone Dolmen
Poulnabrone Dolmen

Poulnabrone Dolmen

This is perhaps the most photographed attraction in Clare after the Cliffs of Moher. It is situated 8 km south of Ballyvaughan, about 10 km north-west of Kilnaboy. The structure dates from the Neolithic period, and excavations which uncovered the remains of sixteen adults and six children have shed light on burial customs of Clare’s early farming communities

Loop Head Lighthouse

The Loop Head Peninsula

The Loop Head Peninsula at the very tip of southwest Clare is a scenic coastal drive which takes in the coastal villages of Kilrush, Carrigaholt, Kilbaha, Loop Head, Kilkee and Kilrush – the entire journey is a distance of around 81 km.  Top sights to take in include Loop Head’s main town Kilkee which was frequented by the likes of Charlotte Bronte and Alfred Tennyson and Carrigaholt which has outstanding sea views. One of the most beautiful natural features on the peninsula are the Bridges of Ross on the western side of Ross Bay harbour, looking north to the Atlantic Ocean. At the very tip of the peninsula, you will find Loop Head and its famous lighthouse.

Fanore Beach

Fanore

Clare is a very popular surfing destination and it is known throughout the world as a surf destination. Fanore, in particular, is famous for surfing and water sports. Fanore is a small little village and it has accommodation options along the beach to stay and enjoy the waves and ocean. It does not matter your surf ability – with surf schools available it caters for everyone and don’t be afraid to try and catch a wave on The Wild Atlantic Way!

Doolin Cave Source: doolincave.ie

Aillwee & Doolin Caves

County Clare is blessed with its unique landscape in the Burren area and it has some of the most famous caves in the country. Take a tour at the Aillwee Cave and explore the winding passages, chasm, rock formations and waterfalls. Doolin Cave is famous for its Great Stalactite and you will get the chance to go underground by 200 feet and be transported back 350 million years.

Scattery Island Source TripAdvisor

Scattery Island

Scattery Island can be reached by boat from Kilrush pier during the summer season with guided tours available free of charge. It is a monastic island and named after the mythical monster on the island. It was St Senan who founded the monastic settlement on the island in the 6th century. Over the years the islands have been attacked by the Vikings and others but in spite of this the round tower, cathedral and oratory can still be seen. The last island dwellers left in 1978 for the mainland; who were river pilots and gifted currach handlers. The ruins of the village remain with streets and several churches remaining. On the island also is a Holy Well which has healing properties.

Get in Touch-

The best way to learn about the 10 places to visit in Clare is to discover by yourself! Contact us today for a quotation including some or all of these locations today –

USA & Canada1877 298 7205

UK FreeFone0800 096 9438

International+353 69 77686

http://www.irishtourism.com/

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Best Food In Ireland – Top 10 Foods To Try

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Ireland is known throughout the world for its quality of beers and spirits. Food and drink go hand in hand and Ireland has some excellent food choices that will not disappoint.  Below is a list of some of the best food in Ireland to try on your next visit to Ireland.

Discover some of the best food in Ireland

Irish Stew

Irish stew is fittingly one of the best foods in Ireland and most popular. The ingredients that are put in a stew can vary depending on where you eat it but traditionally it will include lamb meat, potatoes and onions flavoured with barley. The stew is traditionally cooked in a pot over a number of hours at low temperature to give it the best taste. In order for the stew to not become too watery, other ingredients can be added such as herbs and spices; the stew can be thickened by using a lamb stock. Try it and you won’t be disappointed!!

Irish Stew

Shellfish

There are lots of shellfish options in Ireland and it is very popular in Irish cuisine. On the west coast of Ireland, you need to sample the oysters, which comes into season in September. Galway Oyster Festival is “Ireland’s longest running and greatest gourmet extravaganza” – The Rough Guide publication. It is held between September 20th – 24th. If in Ireland around this time – it is worth going to. Other shellfish options to sample are clams in Connemara to Molly Malone’s famed cockles and mussels, and prawns from Dublin  Bay. There is a prawn festival on in Howth Co Dublin.

Oysters for eating at the Galway Market

Black and White Pudding

This type of food can be found in a traditional Irish breakfast or as a stand-alone commonly found on menus as a starter. The most famous flavours of black and white pudding come from Clonakilty or in Kerry you will find the Sneem black pudding which is extremely popular. Pudding is not unique to Ireland but the recipe here is quite special.

Black Pudding

Smoked Salmon

Ireland is renowned throughout the world for its quality of seafood offering. Smoked salmon is a must try while here. Oak smoked salmon from the Burren region on the West Coast of Ireland, the beechwood smoked salmon from the Connemara Smokehouse or in Killarney or Cork try the award-winning smoked salmon from Quinlan’s fish restaurants.

Smoked Salmon

Bacon and Cabbage

On the menu of an Irish pub or restaurant that serves traditional Irish food will be boiled bacon and cabbage. This is a firm favourite among Irish homes and is served with boiled potatoes and can come with different sauces such as parsley. The flavours of the food are incredible and will leave you extremely satisfied.

Bacon and Cabbage

Soda Bread

This is something that you should not depart Ireland without sampling. Like tapas are to Spanish food culture, soda bread is part of ours. Every person who makes the bread has their own recipe and adds their own unique flavour to it. The main ingredients of the soda bread are bicarbonate of soda and buttermilk form the raising agent, which is mixed in with flour. It is sliced and butter used as a topping and can be served with soup or used in sandwiches.

Soda bread

Barmbrack

Barmbrack is another type of bread and it is normally had during lunch or an evening snack. It is a type of bread that is distinctive to Ireland. This bread is typically very popular around Halloween time. It is a mix of half bread and half raisins and served with butter and jam, tea or coffee – there is nothing quite like it.

Barmbrack

Traditional Irish Fry

The traditional full Irish fry is similar to the English fry but we have our own twist on this breakfast classic. Normally, this is had at breakfast and it will set you up for the day. In Northern Ireland, you will find the Ulster Fry which is very popular and is something that you needs to taste while visiting the island of Ireland. Usual ingredients for a fry are bacon, sausages, mushrooms, black and white pudding, fried eggs, hash browns, tomatoes and beans.

Traditional Irish Fry

Colcannon

In essence, colcannon is mashed potatoes mixed with chopped cooked kale, green onions, milk or cream and lots of butter. During St Patrick’s day, it is a particular favourite in Irish homes. This is served by making an impression in the middle of the mash and adding some butter.

Colcannon
Source: Bord Bia

Waterford Blaa

What is special about Irish food is that many counties have some foods particular to them. The Waterford Blaa is bread but it is particular to Co Waterford. It can only be termed a Blaa if it comes from Waterford. Visit Waterford in order to try a Blaa – Waterford city is the oldest in Ireland and it is also known for its Viking culture. The Blaa goes well with butter or bacon (known as rashers in Ireland). This promises to live up to expectations.

Waterford Blaa

Get in Touch-
All these foods can be found on our tours of Ireland and will be on most restaurants, café or pubs menus. If you require any further information about our 2019 tours, please get in touch and one of our Irish based travel experts will be here to assist you in creating your dream holiday to Ireland.

Contact us today for a free tours quotation –

USA & Canada1877 298 7205
UK FreeFone0800 096 9438
International+353 69 77686
www.irishtourism.com

 

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Irish Christmas Traditions

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Christmas in Ireland really is a joyous occasion, a time when family members come to celebrate together, a time for tearful airport reunions, boozie parties, festive food, family gatherings and a time for making lasting memories. We’ve put together a selection of our favourite Irish Christmas Traditions purely for your festive enjoyment!

Christmas Markets

Galway Continental Christmas Market

It’s a relatively new tradition but for the past number of years, Ireland has had some great Christmas markets in the lead up to the Christmas period. Galway Continental Christmas Market is probably the longest running market and here you will find more than fifty traders from Ireland and further afield in Europe. The market is outdoors in the centre of Galway City, complete with Christmassy carousels, mulled wine and festive entertainment! It usually runs from the last week of November until the third week of December. In Northern Ireland, the Belfast Continental Christmas Market is also proving to be very popular with numbers and support growing tremendously every year. This market runs from about the 17th  of November until the 22nd of December.

Christmas Festivals

Two of Ireland’s biggest Christmas Festivals are Waterford Winterval & the Dublin Docklands Festival. Popular attractions in Waterford include a festive horse drawn carriage, a vintage Ferris wheel, a Christmas train ride through the city and the Exploration Dome which showcases 360 degree movies on snow creation, astronomy and more! The festival usually runs from the 21st of November to the 23rd of December. With Christmas Choirs, Brass Bands, Christmas Market Stalls and a Family Christmas Treasure hunt, the Dublin Docklands Christmas Festival has been running successfully for a number of years. It runs from December 12th to 23rd and many of its attractions are free.

The Annual Christmas Swim!

Christmas Swim Portrush ( Photocredit; IB Times )

In coastal towns across the country a freezing cold Atlantic Ocean swim is becoming an annual custom. This is usually done to collect money for local charities or clubs and it is certainly an experience given that the temperature in Ireland around December can drop below freezing point

Hot Port/Hot Whiskey & Enough Food to Feed a Small Army!

Spiced Beef, Christmas Dinner and Hot Whiskey

If there is one thing an Irish mammy knows how to do, it’s  to keep her family well fed at Christmas time! In many households around Ireland Hot Port & Hot Irish Whiskey is the Christmas Drink of choice. Of course, we have the big Turkey dinner on Christmas day and at home in Cork where I hail from we have Spiced Beef on Christmas Eve.

The Wren Boys

The Wren Boys, North Cork

Hunting the Wren (pronounced ‘Ran’ in some places) is one of my personal favourite Irish Christmas Traditions. People have been doing this for hundreds of years in many places throughout Ireland. To hunt the wren, local musicians and dancers dress up and paint their faces, and travel from door to door singing, dancing and playing Irish music. ‘Wren Boys’ go around on Saint Stephen’s Day, the 26th December and money will be collected, usually for local clubs or charities. The original Wren Boys would have hunted and killed a wren in advance to take on parade with them but that’s not done anymore. Local legend tells us that the reason the wren is hunted is because of its involvement in the betrayal of St. Stephen. Another version of this tradition says it’s to celebrate the Wren as the King of all birds. Legend says the Wren is the king because once all the birds in Ireland had a race to see who could fly the highest. The eagle was winning but the clever wren jumped up on his shoulder and flew the final length beating all the other birds, including the eagle!

The Annual Roses Vs Quality Street Debate

Roses vs Quality Street

In an Irish household at Christmas you will find either one or the other of these types of sweets.  A point of constant debate is which one is better. Personally I go for the quality street every time!

Get in Touch-
The best way to learn about Ireland is to visit yourself. Contact us today for a quotation including some or all of these locations today –

USA & Canada1877 298 7205
UK FreeFone0800 096 9438
International+353 69 77686
www.irishtourism.com

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The Aran Islands – For A Unique look at Ireland’s Culture and Heritage

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What are The Aran Islands and why are they interesting?

The Aran Islands; Inishmore (Irish Spelling Inis Mór), Inisheer (Inis Oírr) and Inishmaan (Inis Meáin) are located off the coast of Galway.  The islands lie about 13km (8 miles) from the coast of Galway. This distance to the mainland has made the islands far more traditional than the rest of Ireland. Many traditional farming and crafts can still be seen on the island and the people speak Irish as their first language here.

Aerial view of Aran Islands

The landscape on the Aran Islands may be like nothing you have seen before. It is karst and rocky and you will find land made fields surrounded by stone walls.

The Aran Islands Inisheer (Inis Oirr)
The Aran Islands Lanscape, Inisheer (Inis Oirr)

How to get to the Aran Islands –

This information was a bit long for this blog post so please see our separate post on How to get to the Aran Islands

Some Aran Island Traditions –

Clothes – The Aran Islands are famous of course for the traditional Aran Sweater but some other clothes are also unique to the island; the men for example wore a woven belt called a Crios and leather shoes called Pampooties! You can find out more about traditional Aran dress in the Stitches in Time exhibition at the Aras Eanna centre on Inisheer.

Land Making – The land on the Aran Islands is karst and rocky so the locals have to create land, they do this by mixing sand and seaweed and placing on top of rocks to create fertile soil.

Currachs, Inisheer (Inis Oirr)
Currachs, Inisheer (Inis Oirr)

Currach Boats – you may see these lying on the beaches on Aran Islands, they are a traditional Irish boat with a wooden frame over which animal skin would have been stretched over, although modern Currachs are now covered with canvas. These Currachs were a lifeline for Aran natives in times before motor powered boats and ferry crossings.

Day Trip or Stay Overnight?

Many of our clients take day trips to the Aran Islands. We recommend getting the morning ferry or flight and taking the evening ferry home. Make sure you leave in plenty of time and arrive at your departure point about 30 minutes early. The ferries usually leave on time and the journey to ports can sometimes take longer than expected. Calculate the time it will take you to get from your location to the port and add an hour to it!

There is ample accommodation on all of the islands, should you wish to stay overnight. There is a hotel on Inishmore as well as several good B&Bs, Inisheer has a small hotel/guesthouse and several good B&Bs and Inishmaan has several good quality B&Bs.

Get in Touch with us about booking your Ireland package including the Aran Islands and we can secure you the best available accommodation.

Aran Islands & Disabilities –

Although some of the ferries may have wheelchair access, access to the ferry is often by floating pontoon which may not be suitable for wheelchair users, depending on tides. The best thing to do is to check with the ferry company a few days in advance.

The islands themselves are not totally disabled friendly, the tour companies on the ground do not have wheelchair adapted buses and the ground can be quite uneven in places and so is not ideal for maneuvering wheelchairs around.

Get in Touch-

The best way to learn about the Aran Islands is to visit yourself. Contact us today to book your trip!

USA & Canada1877 298 7205

UK FreeFone0800 096 9438

International+353 69 77686

http://www.irishtourism.com/

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6 Places to Visit in Ireland at Halloween

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Ireland is famous for Halloween and some ghostly places to visit since its origins date back to the ancient Celtic Festival of Samhain. The origins of Samhain are from Celtic pagan roots and is a festival in Gaelic and its meaning is the end of the harvest season and the beginning of Winter. This festival is traditionally celebrated from October 31st to November 1st.  In this month’s blog are some recommended places to visit in Ireland at Halloween to that will not disappoint.

6 Places to Visit in Ireland at Halloween

Derry Halloween Festival 

Around the globe places vie as to where is the best place to celebrate Holloween. Think of Transylvania, home of Dracula or Salem Massachusetts for its heritage of witches. Derry can be regarded as one of the best destinations when it comes to celebrating Halloween, the city is truly one of the most memorable places to visit during Halloween season.  The city of Derry packs a punch when it comes to Halloween and in 2015 USA Today named Derry as the “best Halloween destination in the world”. Derry as a city is full of creativity and puts on a spectacular show with creative costumes. This history of great costumes comes from the people of the city with its heritage of shirt factories.  The festival usually runs annually from the 26th of October to the 3rd of November and there is something for everyone and with a mix of music and harvest markets for foodies.

Derry Halloween Festival

Westport House Halloween Festival

Westport House located on the West of Ireland in Co. Mayo which promises to scare you during Halloween season. This festival is normally happening on the 27th to the 31st of October annually. It is a perfect treat for individuals or all the family and has something for everyone to enjoy. During the festival for Halloween, the Estate House is transformed into a spooky old mansion and visit the dark dungeons where Pirate Queen  Grace O’ Malley locked up her prisoners. There is lots more to this Halloween festival and worth a visit.

Westport House & Gardens - Things to do in Mayo
Westport House & Gardens

Spirit of Meath Halloween Festival

This festival happens all around Meath County in the historic Boyne Valley from 6th of October up until 4th of November annually. It is one of Ireland’s biggest Halloween festivals and a short drive from Dublin city centre. The festival goes from Haunted Hills to Eerie Graveyards, Tour of Shadow to friendly witches to spells and terrifying Terror Houses.  You can visit during the day and be spooked at night. The Spirit of Meath Festival makes for an electrifying display of Halloween horrors.

Halloween at Spirit of Meath Halloween Festival at Newgrange

Bram Stoker Festival

This festival offers 4 days of adventure usually between 26th – 29th of October and has something for everyone with its gothic programme of events in Dublin city. There are some free and some ticketed events for families and adults. This a great way to experience Halloween in Dublin’s capital city.  Bram Stroker was the creator of Dracula’s and worked in Dublin Castle as a clerk. This Halloween festival celebrates the thrill of Halloween and the mysterious after dark and looks into the legacy of Ireland’s most valued authors.

Bram Stoker Festival

The Crumlin Road Gaol – Belfast

This is a great place to enjoy the Halloween fever on the island of Ireland. The  Crumlin Road Gaol offers the ultimate Halloween ghostly experience from its history from when it opened in 1846 and closed in 1996. For over 150 years it was a fully operational prison and has lots of eerie stories that you will learn about. A great way to enjoy this is to take a tour and learn about all aspects of the Gaol from the tunnels linking the courthouse on one side of Crumlin Road to the hospital, graveyard to the hanging cell and Governor’s office. This prison has had over 25,000 prisoners, with 17 men executed and has witnessed deaths, marriages, births and have and has been the scene of escapes, hunger strikes and riots.

The Crumlin Road Gaol, Belfast

Kilmainham Gaol – Dublin

Halloween and prisons become very popular as places to visit as they are famously haunted buildings and Kilmainham Gaol is not different.  Ghostly tales surround the prison and it has been said that lights have mysteriously been turning on and off in the prison chapel.  The prison is a symbol of Ireland’s past from militant and nationalism from the rebellion in 1798 to the Irish Civil War of 1922 -23. The leaders in these rebellion movements were detained in Kilmainham and sometimes executed. Opened in 1796 as the County Gaol for Dublin and it closed its door in 1924. This is truly a great place to visit in Ireland as a Halloween attraction or any time of the year and experience some of Ireland history and listen to the ghosts of the past.

Kilmainham Gaol, Dublin

Get in Touch-

The best way to learn about Halloween in Ireland is to visit! Contact us today for a  free quotation including some or all of these locations today. We can tailor your itinerary on any of our Self Drive or Chauffeured tours.

USA & Canada1877 298 7205

UK FreeFone0800 096 9438

International+353 69 77686

http://www.irishtourism.com/

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10 Of The Most Popular Things to Do In Dublin

We’ve compiled a list of the 10 Most Popular Things to do in Dublin to help you decide what to take in when you Visit!
Dublin is our capital city and one of the most multicultural cities in the world today and a must visit for anyone visiting Ireland. Most international traffic arrives through Dublin airport so most people will enjoy at least a few days in the city and explore all the attractions that it has to offer. Founded by the Vikings in 998AD, the city has a varied and interesting past and quite a few stories to tell. If it is your first trip to Dublin, you might want to tick a few of these famous visitor spots off your list:

Visit Kilmainham Gaol

Kilmainham Gaol is one of the biggest unoccupied prisons in Europe, it is now a museum and access is by guided tour. When it opened in 1796, the prison was one of the most modern of its time. Since then it has housed many political prisoners including those associated with the 1916 Easter Rising. Tours can get very busy and if you plan to visit, do call ahead or book tickets online.

Things to do in Dublin -Kilmainham Gaol exterior - door and flag pole
Kilmainham Gaol exterior – door and flag pole

See Glasnevin Cemetery

The Glasnevin Cemetery opened in 1832 and contains monuments and graves of some of Ireland’s most prominent national figures including Michael Collins, Éamon de Valera, Arthur Griffith, Maude Gonne, Luke Kelly of the Dubliners and many more. Onsite, in the world’s first cemetery museum visitors can learn about the history and the lives of more than 1.5 million people that are buried in the cemetery.

Glasnevin Cemetery

Visit the Museums & Chapel Royal at Dublin Castle

Dublin Castle was built in 1204 and was until 1922 the seat of the United Kingdom government administration in Ireland. Today it houses The Chapel Royal, The Chester Beatty Library which displays artistic treasures from around the world, The Revenue Museum which offers an interesting history of tax collection in Ireland and the State Apartments;  the venue for Ireland’s Presidencies of the European Union, Presidential inaugurations and prestigious functions. The grounds of the site are free to explore, admission to the State Apartments is by guided tour only and tickets can be purchased in the Upper Castle Yard in advance.

Things to do in Dublin -Exterior of Chapel Royale, Dublin Castle
Exterior of Chapel Royale, Dublin Castle

Walk Around Trinity College & See the Book of Kells Exhibition

Things to do in Dublin -Trinity College Old Library
Trinity College Old Library

Trinity College was founded in 1592 by Queen Elizabeth I, it is Ireland’s oldest university and has had many famous students including Oscar Wilde, Bram Stoker and Jonathan Swift. Visitors to the College can enjoy guided tours of the magnificent Old Library and Book of Kells Exhibition. Online booking is recommended and you can purchase tickets here. Visitors with pre-booked tickets will be allowed access at their allocated time-slot. For a more enjoyable experience, you are better off purchasing your tickets online.

Have a pint at the Guinness Storehouse

The Guinness Storehouse is one of Dublin’s busiest attractions and one of the most popular things to do in Dublin. The museum is set out over seven floors which surround a glass atrium in the shape of a pint of Guinness. The exhibition covers the process of making Guinness, right through to the marketing, sales and distribution of the finished product. The seventh floor houses the Gravity Bar with fantastic views of Dublin City.

Guinness Storehouse

Enjoy The (Free Entry) National Museums of Ireland

Three out of our four national museums are located in Dublin; The Museum of Archaeology and the Natural History Museums are located quite close to each other off Kildare Street and the Decorative Arts and History Museum is located at the Old Collins Barracks on Benburn Street. All of these museums are free entry and well worth a visit!

Things to do in Dublin -Natural History Museum
Natural History Museum

Visit Christchurch Cathedral & Dublinia

Christchurch Cathedral is the elder of Dublin’s two cathedrals, the other being St. Patricks. The cathedral famously contains the tomb of Strongbow, a medieval Norman-Welsh warlord who came to Ireland at the invitation of King Diarmuid MacMorrough. The cathedral also contains the largest Crypt in Ireland and amongst the things, you will find there are secular carvings and the mummified corpses of a Cat & a Rat, commonly nicknamed Tom & Jerry! The adjacent Dublinia Exhibition is especially great for kids but enjoyable by most anybody, it covers the period of Dublin’s history from the arrival of the Anglo-Normans to the closure of the monasteries in the 1540s.

Things to do in Dublin -Dublinia
Dublinia

See The GPO & New GPO Museum

The General Post Office (GPO) is the headquarters of the Irish Post Office and one of O’Connell Streets most prominent buildings. During the Easter Rising of 1916, the GPO famously served as the headquarters for the rebellion leaders. The GPO Witness History Museum documents the building’s history and brings the events of the Easter Rising to life.

GPO Witness History Museum

Do Some Shopping on Grafton Street

Grafton Street Performer
Grafton Street Street Performer

 

Characterised by energetic buskers and talented streets artists, Grafton Street and the surrounding streets contains some of the best shopping to be had in Dublin. There are also lots of nice cafes and bars in this area. Nearby at Meeting House Square, there are often theatre and film screenings and on Saturdays, there is an excellent organic food market.

 

Check out the Night Life at Temple Bar

Temple Bar is one of the best places to be in Dublin by night! Home to some of Dublin’s best traditional music bars and restaurants as well as some great art galleries, popular watering holes include The Palace Bar, The Temple Bar Pub, Oliver St. John Gogarty’s and The Auld Dubliner.

Things to do in Dublin -The Temple Bar Pub, Temple Bar
The Temple Bar Pub, Temple Bar

Get in Touch-

The best way to learn about all the things to do in Dublin is to visit yourself. Contact us today for a  free quotation including some or all of these locations today. We can tailor your itinerary on any of our Self Drive or Chauffeured tours.

Contact us today for a quotation including some or all of these locations today –

USA & Canada1877 298 7205

UK FreeFone0800 096 9438

International+353 69 77686

http://www.irishtourism.com/

 

 

 

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6 Romantic Places in Ireland to Visit

Ireland is known as one of the most romantic places in the world. When you think of old-school romance Ireland is a place that pops to the front of your mind. There are places all over Ireland, full of excitement, magic, mystic and the adventures that romance brings. In this month’s blog, you will have the opportunity to learn about some of the 6 most romantic places in Ireland to visit.

“What the heart knows today the head will understand tomorrow”
– Irish writer James Stephens (1882 – 1950)

Whatever your length of holiday, Ireland provides charm and romance in all regions of Ireland. At Irish Tourism, we have excellent packages available for romantic Castle and Manors tours.  With an influx of honeymooners every year to Ireland we can tailor a package to suit your needs and wants that you are looking for on a romantic Honeymoon break that can include a castle stay.

6 Most Romantic Places in Ireland to Visit

Causeway Coast Co Antrim

Romance Places in Ireland to Visit
Causeway Coast County Antrim

This area on the island of Ireland is widely regarded as one of the most scenic and romantic places in Ireland to visit. Lonely Planet has named it in their 2018 ranking as one of the best regions in the world to visit. On this Causeway Coast, you get to experience the UNESCO World Heritage Site – Giants Causeway to the Carrick – a – Rede Rope Bridge offering breathtaking views of the coastline. Dunluce Castle is an iconic medieval ruin castle on the Causeway coast. Built in the 1550’s MacQuillan family. This caste is full of charm and comes with lots of history and stories.

Connemara, County Galway

Connemara is situated just one hour west of Galway city, is one of the beautiful and romantic places in Ireland to visit.  As you drive back into the heart of the Connemara region you can’t help but not be engulfed in the romance of the area with its rugged landscape and is easy to see why it is one of the most romantic places in Ireland. To signify its romance stature it was the film location of The Quiet Man, a romantic comedy. Connemara has everything you need to enjoy some special time with a loved one from a cosy thatched pub, pretty secluded beaches, mountain, forest walks and adventure.

Romantic Places to Visit in Ireland
Connemara County Galway

Ring of Kerry

Kerry located on the Southwest Coast of Ireland and it is famous for its 180km Ring of Kerry drive with is a stunning array of photo opportunities throughout the drive. Panoramic pictures of bays, inlets, lakes and the highest mountain range in Ireland in the Macgillyicuddy Reeks with the highest mountain being Carrauntoohil. The most recent famous attraction off the Ring of Kerry road on the southern part is the Skellig Ring where you can see Skellig Michael where the recent Start War films have been filmed on the UNESCO World Heritage Site. Detour off from the town of Caherciveen and return to the Ring of Kerry road from Ballinskellig area and continue towards the village of Waterville made famous as the holiday vacation place of Charlie Chaplin. Kerry is widely regarded as one of the most romantic places in Kerry to visit.

Romantic Places to Visit in Ireland
Ring of Kerry Coastline

Lough Eske, County Donegal

If you are looking to experience romance in Ireland, Donegal is an excellent choice to pick. National Geographic has recognised this and in 2017 put it on the top of the Cool List for 2017.  Lough Eske is a small lake located northeast of Donegal town. You have the beautiful Lough Eske Castle if you want to treat yourself and your partner to a nice romantic setting.  Also, there is Harveys Point Hotel nestled in the heart of the Blue Stack Mountains and also on the waters of Lough Eske, rated as the Top 4* Hotel in Ireland by TripAdvisor. It is the perfect place to visit when in Ireland on a romantic break.

Lough Eske County Donegal

Powerscourt, County Wicklow

Powerscourt is surrounded by the Wicklow Mountains and is a truly magical place to experience and explore. Powerscourt Estate less than one hour south of Dublin City; the estate is full of romance and grandeur with splendid gardens filled with spectacular flowerbeds, lakes, walking path for romantic strolls and endless green spaces. A short drive away is Ireland’s highest waterfall which is the perfect place for a romantic walk, take photos and also a beautiful place for a picnic with a loved one.

Romantic Places to Visit in Ireland
Powerscourt Estate

Gougane Barra, County Cork

Gougane Barra National Park is set in 1,000 acres in the unspoilt landscape it is an ideal location for romance in Ireland. Gougane Barra National Park is located just over an hour west of Cork City. This is a special place and it is not so crowded so you are guaranteed some quiet romantic time. It has some beautiful walks that take you down by the picturesque lake. You will find a small church that was once a Christian monastery founded by St Finbar, the patron saint of Cork. If you want some extra adventure you can enjoy cycling, fishing or boat trips that are very romantic.

Romantic Places to Visit in Ireland
Gougane Barra County Cork

Get in Touch-

The best way to learn about Ireland, its charm and romance that it offers from the place is to visit and experience them yourself and your loved one.  Contact us today for a free quotation from our dedicated travel advisors who will be able to help you create your ideal romantic trip to Ireland and answer any questions you may have. We can tailor your itinerary on any of our Self Drive or Chauffeured tours.

USA & Canada1877 298 7205

UK FreeFone0800 096 9438

International+353 69 77686

http://www.irishtourism.com/

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Top 10 Things To Do on Ireland’s Ancient East

This month’s blog gives you the opportunity to learn about some of the Top 10 Things to Do on Ireland’s Ancient East. Ireland’s Ancient East starts on the south of Ireland by Cork’s Spike Island and takes in Cahir & Kilkenny Castle, Rock of Cashel to the Boyne Valley, Newgrange and Glendalough on the East Coast through to the northern region of Ireland to counties of Cavan and Monaghan and much much more in between. The aim is to have a memorable experience while on the trail & you will gain inspiration from the places that will map your journey. Discover the legends and stories and let you discover your own Ireland’s Ancient East!

Source: Discover Ireland

Dublin is an excellent base to plan your immersive journey on Ireland’s Ancient East. Dublin is a city that is full of history with tales and stories.  With an abundance of history here, take a guided tour of Trinity College and see one of Ireland’s great cultural treasure in the Book of Kells. Along with its many more popular renowned attractions Guinness Storehouse, James Joyce Museum, Christchurch Cathedral, Kilmainham Gaol &  Glasnevin Cemetry, the options are endless for you.

Trinity College - Ireland's Ireland East
Trinity College – Book of Kells

Top 10 Things to Do on Ireland’s Ancient East

Glendalough, Co Wicklow
Glendalough is one of the top things to do on Ireland’s Ancient East and is one of the most important monastic sites in ancient Ireland. St. Kevin founded the Christian monastic settlement in the 6th century; from there developed into what could be termed a “Monastic City”. What you will see presently are buildings that survive from the 10th to the 12th century. In spite of various attacks from the Vikings, Glendalough thrived as a great foundation for learning until the Normans destroyed the monastery in 1214 A.D. Also close by to the monastic settlements you can visit the visitor centre and listen to the audiovisuals and see the model monastic city on display.

Glendalough National Park - Ireland's Ancient East
Glendalough National Park

Newgrange, Co Meath
When you think and imagine ancient Ireland, Newgrange is one of the things that springs to mind immediately. This is one of the main attractions that can be found on Ireland’s Ancient East trail and within one hour of Dublin City Centre. The attractions also include Knowth & Dowth but to get to these you will need to go to the visitor centre via a short bus journey. Newgrange is the only attraction that is accessible to the public with a chamber. Newgrange is really popular during winter solstice but to get tickets for the event is challenging but worth going to watch for the memorable experience.

Newgrange Ireland's Ancient East
Newgrange

Clonmacnoise, Co Offaly
Clonmacnoise is located near Shannonbridge in County Offaly and is a top attraction on Ireland’s Ancient East trail. Wander through the ruins and it will give you images of the saints and scholars of Ireland’s Golden Age of learning. Founded by St Ciaran in the 6th century, it became a special place for learning and religion. Clonmacnoise is full of heritage and tales to capture your imagination. You will find ruins of round towers, graves, churches and celtic crosses. The Clonmacnoise graveyard is still in use and religious studies are regularly held on site in a modern chapel and was visited by Pope John Paul II in 1979.  Visiting will give you a true feeling of the history of Ireland.

Clonmacnoise Ireland's Ancient East
Clonmacnoise

Kilkenny Castle, Co Kilkenny
A great place to visit on Ireland’s Ancient East trail is the historic medieval city of Kilkenny. In the heart of the city is Kilkenny Castle and its gardens. As you enter the castle, it can feel like you are stepping back in time to the 12th Century, which has been remodeled and restored to its 1830 state. Kilkenny is strategically situated on the River Noire and dominates the “High Town” of Kilkenny City. With its beautifully maintained gardens and surrounds, Kilkenny Castle makes for the perfect attraction and to get romanised and transported to medieval times. Also, the castle is the start of the Medieval Mile in Kilkenny City which takes you on a journey through the heart of the city to St Canice’s Cathedral to the famous Smithwick’s Brewery.

Kilkenny Castle Ireland's Ancient East
Kilkenny Castle

Rock of Cashel,  Co Tipperary
This is a stunning group of buildings of the medieval style set upon looking over the town of Cashel Co Tipperary in the area known as the Golden Vale. The Rock of Cashel consists of a 12th century round tower, High Cross and Romanesque Chapel, 13th-century Gothic cathedral, 15th century Castle and the restored Hall of the Vicars Choral. This attraction is one for everyone to put on their to-do list when traveling Ireland Ancient East. The attraction comes with audiovisual shows and exhibitions.

Rock of Cashel Ireland's Ancient East
Rock of Cashel

Spike Island, Co Cork
Spike Islands is a Winner of Europe’s Leading Tourist Attraction 2017 at the World Travel Awards! Spike Island is located off the town of Cobh County Cork. It has a varied history over the past 1300 years from being a 6th-century Monastery, a Fortress and during Victorian times, the largest convict depot in the world. With the rich history, there is something for everyone and learn about Ireland’s ancient past. Habitants on the island have included monks and monasteries, rioters and redcoats, captains and convicts and sinners and saints. Why not take the scenic ferry ride from Kennedy Pier in Cobh and enjoy the guided tour of the island and enjoy the surroundings while enjoying the views from the café.

Spike Island - Ireland's Ancient East
Spike Island

Carrickmacross Workhouse
Carrickmacross Workhouse is located in the northern location of Ireland’s Ancient East in the heart of the historical barony of Farney in County Monaghan. This Workhouse has been meticulously restored and tells a lot about Ireland’s history and heritage during that time. The reason for building these workhouses was for the poor of Carrickmacross town and the nearby parishes of Donaghmoyne, Inniskeen, Killanny, Magheracloone, Magheross and part of Bawn in 1841. During this time in Ireland population was close to 9 million with 3 million living in a state of destitute due principally to the evictions by British landlord. Carrickmacross Workhouse was one of a total of 130 built between 1841 & 1843 to house poor in society. In order to enter the Workhouse, you had to surrender any land where living conditions were poor and rules were strict and families were separated and forbidden from seeing each other without prior permission. The food was poor, and the hard physical work had to be undertaken. For people admissions to the workhouse became a last resort in life and became known as a “Poor Man’s Jail”. Definitely worth a visit if you want to immerse yourself in Irish History.

Carrickmacross Workhoue Ireland's Ancient East
Carrickmacross Workhouse

Cavan Burren Park, Co Cavan
One of the “Hidden Gems” of Ireland’s Ancient East and a top thing to put on your itinerary if you are in the area. The Cavan Burren Park is located in County Cavan. This park opened in 2014 but has been here for centuries before that, this is a perfect attraction if you are interested in the outdoors and with a good pair of outdoor footwear you can explore the glacial boulders, rock art,  and explore the ancient times of Cavan Burren Park. It is certainly worth the journey and it is away from the traditional tourist trail so you will not be caught in the midst of huge crowds. What will attracts you here is mainly the natural landscape with sights such as the Giants Cave constructed over 4,000 years ago.

Cavan Burren Park Ireland's Ancient East
Cavan Burren Park

Waterford’s Viking Triangle
Waterford’s Viking Trail is located on the “Sunny South East” of Ireland. Waterford is Ireland’s oldest cities and only city in Ireland that Oliver Cromwell did not conquer. The cities Viking Settlement date back to 914. Visit Reginald’s Tower where you will get a chance to see the full set Viking weapons that have survived in Ireland. To learn more about the Viking Trail, visit the Medieval Museum and immerse yourself in the Viking era in Ireland.

Waterford Viking Trail
Waterford Viking Trail

Waterford’s Greenway
The Waterford Greenway opened in March 2017 and is an excellent attraction to the Waterford region and to Ireland’s Ancient East and definitely one of the top things to do while exploring the “Sunny South East”. It is 46km of off-road cycling and walking trail along the old railway line. This route will give you the chance to experience the natural landscape of Ireland while your journey takes you across three viaducts from the river to sea.

Waterford Greenway Ireland's Ancient East
Waterford Greenway

Get in Touch-

The best way to learn about Ireland’s Ancient East and explore the surrounding places that are on the trail is to visit by yourself.  Contact us today for a quotation from our dedicated travel advisors including some or all of these locations  – We can tailor your itinerary around what we have to offer on Ireland’s Ancient East Self Drive or Chauffeured tours.

USA & Canada1877 298 7205

UK FreeFone0800 096 9438

International+353 69 77686

http://www.irishtourism.com/

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